Saturday, December 13, 2014

The Hornbill Festival


The most famous festival in our region is the Hornbill Festival. Named after the Great Indian Hornbill which figures in the folklore of many tribes of our region, the festival is held every year from 1-10 December. The best of everything that about the state of Nagaland is beautifully displayed in this festival. Being an agrarian society, many of the dances are connected with sowing and harvesting. The clothes that the performers wear are vibrant. Each tribe has their own distinctive colours and patterns.
Hornbill Festival
A view of Kohima, the capital of Nagaland, seen from our hotel window

Hornbill Festival
The venue of the festival at Kisama about 12 kms from Kohima
Kisama, the Naga Heritage Village where the festival is held every year, is about 12 kms from the capital city of Kohima. Nagas are fine craftsmen. The objects on display and sale had many figurines of humans, birds and animals. I loved the horticultural section where local produce were sold. Spices, fruits and vegetables vied for space in the shelves.

Hornbill Festival

The pictures below show the different tribes performing. All the tribes take part and for visitors, it is a wonderful opportunity to see them all on one platform.
Hornbill Festival


Hornbill Festival


Hornbill Festival


Hornbill Festival
The Dimasa troupe at the festival


Hornbill Festival
The horticultural section had many different begonias


Hornbill Festival
Contests held during the festival


Hornbill Festival
Kitchen and garden equipment for sale

Hornbill Festival
Finely crafted bamboo and wooden cups, containers, stands and trays


Hornbill Festival
The representation of the tribes were also in their dwellings, or the replica of the village dwellings that also had a kitchen from where the food was cooked and served. We feasted on rice beer, fried pork, chicken, and snails cooked with perilla seeds. Food and drink were served in bamboo glasses and banana leaf plates. The outer area displayed (also for sale were) traditional clothes, jewellery and bamboo and wooden decorative as well as utility items. 
Hornbill Festival
One of the kitchens


Hornbill Festival
Young girls enjoy a nutritious drink made of locally-grown maize
Hornbill Festival

Right from top the view of the "morungs" or dwellings built on different levels. This is by far the most well-arranged festival in our region. No wonder it has grown over the years. We spent a day there but a day isn't enough.Maybe next year we'll find ourselves heading back to Nagaland to spend more time at the Hornbill Festival.
Post a Comment